What does a trade war look like in Asia?

Trading is now on the rise in Asia, with the Chinese government pushing its biggest export in decades, coal, to Asia.

And it’s making it tougher for some of the biggest players in the region to stay competitive.

China has pushed to create more markets for its coal and other coal-based products in recent years, in an effort to boost domestic production.

It wants to expand export terminals in India, Vietnam and other countries to ship coal to China and other Asian nations.

But the United States has long maintained a strong grip on coal in Asia.

Coal accounts for about 80 percent of the region’s total energy demand, and the U.S. has long sought to block Chinese efforts to sell its products.

“The Chinese government has been pushing for coal exports in Asia since 2011,” said Steven Latham, director of the China-Asia Program at the Brookings Institution.

U.S.-China trade warThe United States is the largest exporter to China, and has long pushed for greater trade in the coal sector, arguing that China has used the coal market to drive up its own power prices.””

This is not just about China; this is about the world as a whole.”

U.S.-China trade warThe United States is the largest exporter to China, and has long pushed for greater trade in the coal sector, arguing that China has used the coal market to drive up its own power prices.

“If China wants more coal, and if China is looking for more exports, it has to do better,” said Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who is pushing to lift the U,S.

ban on coal exports.

China, in turn, has made it harder for some major companies to open up new markets for their products.

The United Kingdom, for example, has been a major buyer of Chinese coal, but in recent months has faced pressure from the Trump administration to stop buying coal from China.

The Trump administration is also pushing to block coal imports from Vietnam, Vietnam’s biggest trading partner, which imports more than half of the world’s coal.

“This is really a trade conflict,” Latham said.

“And China is going to try to fight it.”

China has long tried to block U.N.-mandated carbon pricing, which has forced the world to cut its greenhouse gas emissions.

It also is pushing for the U.,S.

to lift a decades-old ban on U.K.-based carbon trading, which is aimed at stanching global warming.

In June, China imposed a new emissions-trading scheme that could raise tariffs on U-bound Chinese coal imports, while the U and others have sought to use the threat of a trade battle to push ahead with an international climate deal.

But Latham believes Beijing is not making it easy for the United Sates to win the war on coal.

U.s. exports to China fell by $17.3 billion in the fourth quarter, compared with a year earlier, the Commerce Department said in a report released on Thursday.

The trade war could have a major impact on the global coal industry, he said.

China imports nearly 40 percent of U. S. coal exports, and a U.C.L.A. report found that U. C.L., a subsidiary of China General Chemical Co., and another Chinese company, Hunan Steel Corp., have been exporting coal to the U for decades.

In the U.-China coal trade war, China would have to accept lower prices for its product and pay for the lower prices with higher tariffs, which could lead to tariffs being imposed on other U. s exports, Latham added.

“In the long run, the U’s ability to compete in the world coal market depends on how it handles the China trade war,” Lacey said.